Interference

In my post ‘Trouble Concentrating and Staying Focused‘, I started with the following –

Common adult symptoms of ADD – Trouble concentrating and staying focused

  • “zoning out” without realizing it, even in the middle of a conversation
  • extreme distractibility; wandering attention makes it hard to stay on track
  • difficulty paying attention or focusing, such as when reading or listening to others
  • struggling to complete tasks, even ones that seem simple
  • tendency to overlook details, leading to errors or incomplete work
  • poor listening skills; hard time remembering conversations and following directions

In today’s post I start with the following –

My mind wanders and my thinking is fast and furious; therefore, trying to concentrate each day to accomplish any task can be difficult.

That is the ADD part of me, I become defensive when interrupted while trying to complete tasks.  Gary will interrupt me and I become upset because I am already frustrated with the lack of concentration I am experiencing.

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I look forward to trying to complete something, anything and Gary’s interruptions makes me feel he needs my attention at that very moment.  This frustrates me as I am unable to complete my tasks and I take my frustrations out on him.

This is not good and I understand this; the frustration is within myself because of myself and I should not allow the outside interference to upset me.

In my post ‘Trouble Concentrating and Staying Focused‘, I ended with the following –

I try to stay focused on what I need to overcome, focus on listening when someone is talking to me, focus on completing tasks, focus on concentrating and focus on focusing.

I understand taking medications would diminish the symptoms and then I would not have such a challenge to take on.  But without the challenge I will not become stronger to overcome the symptoms.

In today’s post I conclude with the following –

thefreedictionary.com –

in·ter·fer·ence    (ĭn′tər-fîr′əns)

1.

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Image Provided by: http://www.indiatimes.com

  1. The act or an instance of hindering, obstructing, or impeding.
  2. Something that hinders, obstructs, or impedes.

2.

  1. The wave that forms when two or more waves of the same or different frequencies come together. The amplitude of the resulting wave will be either larger or smaller than the amplitude of the individual waves, depending on whether or not their peaks and troughs match up. ♦ If the peaks of the waves match up, the amplitude of the resulting wave will be larger than that of the individual waves.

38 thoughts on “Interference

    • Thanks Sarah, for me at this point in MY life, I choose not to take medication for my ADD. As much as I struggle with different areas within myself, I feel the need for the challenge – it provides me motivations to becoming better. Always appreciate your comments – happy day! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Thank you for sharing! You made something just click for me with my son. He often gets mad and angry with us when we ask him to do something (he may already be doing it and we don’t know) or to fix something about what he’s doing. Makes sense now. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You know what Terry, just the fact that you are aware of the problem, is a good thing. That will make you challenge yourself to defeat the issue, or at least try. Fright the fight my friend, you can do it. Hugs 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Lynne, yes I agree just being aware is half the battle. Maybe not the easy part of it, but insight is a good thing. Thanks for stopping by today, be sure and read tomorrow, it is a special post! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Terry – I really related to this post, and I always appreciate your openness. I made the decision a few years back to take medication to alleviate my ADD symptoms, but I very distinctly remember the waves of frustration and irritation that would pulse thru me when interrupted, how difficult it is for folks wired like us to get back on task when pulled away, and I applaud you for working through it on your own – I’m always cheering for you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Molli, I appreciate that you can understand the difficulties of ADD. I know the medication would help, but for me, I feel a need to have the challenge to overcome this. It may be difficult for others to understand this choice, but it is just a personal one. I appreciate you always stopping by everyday to read – it means a great deal to me. Happy Wednesday! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Very honest post and brave of you to try and overcome these challenges yourself and not take medication. Its difficult when what’s happening to us or inside us can impact on the ones we love and its easy to feel guilt because of this. However, I’m sure Gary is proud of you and is supportive of you to overcome these symptoms. Stay strong! xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for your kind words. This is another aspect of me and my life that I struggle with. I feel a need to overcome these challenges I face, I am not sure if most people understand why I would go down the tougher road so to speak, it is and will be good for me once I reach the end of the road. Hopefully that makes some sense! Thanks for stopping by today, I am always happy to see you! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sometimes the simple option is not the best option in the longer term and medications can be seen as quick fix. Things worth having don’t come easy. If you actually learn how to control your symptoms through things like cognitive work or mindfulness or whatever works for you then you are equipping yourself with tools that you can continue to revisit, use and amend. Overcoming these symptoms and challenges will also give you a confidence boast, and that confidence can then be used to tackle other problems and challenges. I really enjoying stopping in past and reading your posts xx

        Liked by 2 people

  5. Terry you inspire. Anyone reading this who has anything on the spectrum of ADD has you to look to. Personally, I look to you for so much. I think you have no idea how inspiring you are. Properly. Really. Actually.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you Osyth, I can count on you to always bring a smile to my face. You know I have a little low self-esteem, so I do not see myself as inspiring – but if you say I am – then I guess I am. Thanks dear, it is HOT here, what about up your way? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cool compared to you in the mid 80s with zero humidity …. I’m told I need to make the most of it as it’ll heat and humid up and up. I understand low self esteem – in fact my husband left for Europe (back now) a couple of weeks ago as he does all the time ‘you ARE beautiful, you ARE brilliant, you DO deserve good things’ …. I’m afraid it is part of the creative spirit to be fractured and to doubt (unless you are David Hockney).

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  6. You and I are twins, Terry. Our family has some inherited diagnoses of ADD and it is probably part of my diagnosis. No patience, can’t get to the end of a book, forgot about not one but two lunch appointments today (clearly not focusing despite a text reminder). It drives Teddy insane so I feel Gary’s pain but yours, too. Teddy is particularly annoyed that I can’t remember the end of any film or series – it’s my medication!!!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think there are many of ‘us’! I will be reading a post and Gary will ask me a question, and I become frustrated because I know I will have to read the post over again – such a waste of time for me to re-read. I do not comprehend when there is interference with my reading – therefore I have to start over again. I am trying not to let this get to me – and trying to respond in a more positive way. Difficult at times – but I try. And then yes, I rush through things because that is what my mind is doing – then there is the lack of patience – the list goes on! Oh, I am exhausted – so how was your day? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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